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Discussion Starter #1
I was home recently and my son and I jacked up his Malibu to replace his bad rear rim/tire. He brought out his Harbor Fake 80 lb steel floor jack - but we ended up just using the car’s scissor jack because I couldn’t see any way to use the floor jack without causing damage to the car! Looked first at the standard jack point just in front of the rear wheel (where the cutout is for the scissor jack), but it looked like the cradle on the floor jack would’ve crushed all that plastic underneath! Then I thought - under the strut, but the jack ended up too far underneath to operate the pumping handle.

What I’d really like is an adapter that fits over the floor jack cradle that has the head of the scissor jack on it - so it fits in the cutout without touching all the plastic around it.

I know they also make those “pucks”. Is that what everyone uses? On my cars I always put a 2x6 wood block on top of the cradle before jacking up - and I can usually reach a suitable jacking point without causing damage, but this Malibu looked different to me.

How are you 2008 owners using your floor jacks?
 

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On my 2011, I use an aluminum racing-style low-height jack with a rubber insert in the cradle's cup. I can jack up the front and rear with it to change the oil, do the brakes, or anything else.

I agree that it's a bit of an issue with finding a good spot, but even with my car being lowered 1.4", it is not an issue. I got the low-height jack specifically because of lowering it, but I would probably have gotten it even if it wasn't; the car is that low already!

I've considered getting a puck to use on the factory jack points, but I haven't needed it yet. You do need to consider where you jack, though. What appears to be a frame member up front adds strength to the car but it can't be used to jack it. I tried once and it started to bend or crush, so I picked a better spot. I use the hard frame members up front that surround the engine bay, and in the back I jack it up on the suspension pivot points.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
On my 2011, I use an aluminum racing-style low-height jack with a rubber insert in the cradle's cup. I can jack up the front and rear with it to change the oil, do the brakes, or anything else.

I agree that it's a bit of an issue with finding a good spot, but even with my car being lowered 1.4", it is not an issue. I got the low-height jack specifically because of lowering it, but I would probably have gotten it even if it wasn't; the car is that low already!

I've considered getting a puck to use on the factory jack points, but I haven't needed it yet. You do need to consider where you jack, though. What appears to be a frame member up front adds strength to the car but it can't be used to jack it. I tried once and it started to bend or crush, so I picked a better spot. I use the hard frame members up front that surround the engine bay, and in the back I jack it up on the suspension pivot points.
Yeah - we were trying to jack up the rear because it was his rear passenger rim that was bent. So I was trying to reach the suspension components - because there didn't look like any place else, but the jack had to go too far under the car where you could no longer operate the jack!

THAT was the problem - in the rear. Not the front.
 

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About 30 miles south of Boston. I'm originally from where I sent him - because things weren't happening for him where he was (with me). Got all that? LOL!
I think so ...

You're from there where he is, which is not where you are and where he was until he went where he is and where you used to be.

That sound right?

:D
 

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Yeah - we were trying to jack up the rear because it was his rear passenger rim that was bent. So I was trying to reach the suspension components - because there didn't look like any place else, but the jack had to go too far under the car where you could no longer operate the jack!

THAT was the problem - in the rear. Not the front.
I always jack my 'bu's on the torque box inboard from the front pinch weld spot when using a floor jack. Floor jack will get both wheels off the ground if it's big enough of a jack.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I always jack my 'bu's on the torque box inboard from the front pinch weld spot when using a floor jack. Floor jack will get both wheels off the ground if it's big enough of a jack.
I can't picture this, but I'll try to remember that on my next trip.

I "advised" my son to buy the aluminum Harbor Fake floor jack, but somehow "aluminum" turned into "steel", and now this ridiculously-heavy thing has to be lugged out of the basement every time he wants to use it! The good news is: it's probably "big enough" to jack up the entire front-end?
 

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Right behind the front tire pinch weld spot inboard a bit you'll see the square frame looking area. I also use the rearward front cradle mounting spot on vehicles that have that like my old rusty Sables that didn't have any solid pinch weld jack points left. I hate using the pinch weld point, it's there for roadside flat changes only IMO.
 

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I'd love to have something like either one of those, but for the few enough times (thankfully!) that I need to get under my car, my low-profile aluminum jack and heavy duty jackstands are just fine.

However, if someone is giving them away . . . . . .
 
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