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Hi. I read that the 2018 2.0 needs 93 Octane. Well that is not available in North Dakota so how screwed am I for engine issues down the road? We only got 91. :surprise:
 

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I think with 91 you will be fine with expected performance. 93 is "strongly recommended", not required. If you have knock, you might want to see the dealer or trade it in if no 93 is available anywhere. In Michigan where I am our min standard for premium is 90 but we have 92 and 93 almost everywhere. Here is the quote from the user manual for other owners that read this thread (Pg. 263):

"For vehicles with the 2.0L L4 engine, premium unleaded gasoline meeting ASTM specification D4814 with a posted octane rating of 93 is highly recommended for best performance and fuel economy. Unleaded gasoline with an octane rated as low as 87 can be used. Using unleaded gasoline rated below 93 octane, however, will lead to reduced acceleration and fuel economy. If knocking occurs, use a gasoline rated at 93 octane as soon as possible, otherwise, the engine could be damaged."
 

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I’ve been using 91, which is what 95% of premium is around thus area as well, for almost 47K miles without an issue.

You’re fine.
Good to know. With 47K and no issues, do you ever put the pedal to the floor? I normally don't but sometimes I get the urge.
 

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In my 2019 2.0 Equinox Redline, I use both 91 and 93 octane fuels. The 91 is from a BP, Phillips, or Cenex, and is a no ethanol fuel. The 93 octane is from another local BP station, but this one is E-10, 10% ethanol blend.

In colder weather I tend to prefer the 91 no ethanol; when ambient temps are higher and I am using AC and traveling higher speeds under higher loads, I prefer the 93 octane for maximum performance and engine protection.

In our Malibu 1.5 we use 87 or 89 E-10.
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Good to know. With 47K and no issues, do you ever put the pedal to the floor? I normally don't but sometimes I get the urge.
I’m not sure exactly what you’re asking. I’ve been known to punch it when I’m passing someone or if I need to merge into traffic quickly but the days of flooring it at every stoplight, racing, trying to be the fastest car on the road or finding top speed are long over for me. I did specifically buy the 2.0 because I like the style of the car, the 1.5l is anemic and I’m not usually a huge fan of 4 cylinders in general but the 2.0 turbo makes the car fun to drive.

And I have several two wheel vehicles that do a much better job of causing trouble if the urge to be bad strikes.

I don’t baby it, however, if that’s what you’re asking.
 

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All we have out here in Cali is 91 ??? it's all i run in my 17 Regal GS 2.0T and have had no problems, lot of get up and go. :wink:
 

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I wonder what changed between 2013 (91 or higher) to 2018 (...93 is highly recommended)...very grateful that a couple members of this Forum way back when got my attention to this early on...

Bill
 

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I had an Audi that needed premium. Sure it was fun to drive, but with our Malibu Hybrid I don't miss that (here in WI) 20% premium......on premium......
That’s something I just don’t get peoples hang up on, the need for premium fuel.

Normally I fill up at just under a half tank but at times will go down to a 1/4 or so which makes a fill up around 10 gallons roughly. If you’re looking at a $.50 per gallon difference on premium fuel, and it’s usually more like $.25 or so, that’s under $5 a fill up.

The car runs better, it’s peppier, the car is more fun to drive all for less than a crappy Taco Bell lunch or a coffee at Starbucks. I fill up both vehicles maybe twice a week, so figure about $15 for me having to run the good stuff.

Seems like it’s not that big of a deal in my book.
 

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That’s something I just don’t get peoples hang up on, the need for premium fuel.

Normally I fill up at just under a half tank but at times will go down to a 1/4 or so which makes a fill up around 10 gallons roughly. If you’re looking at a $.50 per gallon difference on premium fuel, and it’s usually more like $.25 or so, that’s under $5 a fill up.

The car runs better, it’s peppier, the car is more fun to drive all for less than a crappy Taco Bell lunch or a coffee at Starbucks. I fill up both vehicles maybe twice a week, so figure about $15 for me having to run the good stuff.

Seems like it’s not that big of a deal in my book.
I second your remarks and would add another part that some don't consider.

When you use lower octane fuel in an engine that can properly use the higher octane, you give up not only power but mileage as well.

Many years ago I owned a 1981 Ford LTD with the 302 CID (5.oL for you metrics ;)) and a weird carburetor called a "Variable Venturi". It was a poor example of how to step from an old-fashioned carb to TB FI, and it had components of each. Google for more if you're curious. The reason for bringing this up is not for the sake of telling what I used to drive. I kept a written record of my fill-ups, and what I discovered was the actual cost of fuel in that car, which I believe can be applied to some extent in modern cars. When I used 87 octane and drove the 276 miles from my home to my mother's, that car got 16 mpg and the trip took 4 hours 45 minutes. When I used premium (it was 91, 92, or 93, depending on the station), it got 20 mpg and the trip was 4 hours 30 minutes. I was on I-5 in Northern CA, travelling between Yuba City and Medford, OR. There are a lot of mountains in that neck of the woods and the engine struggled to keep my set speed. On 87, I found it necessary to manually pull it out of OD into D to keep my speed, but with premium it got all the way up most hills and further up the taller ones before I needed to shift.

Now here's the part that some don't consider: the cost at that time for 87 was 80¢ / gallon and premium was $1.00 / gallon. That's 25% more, which is not the difference you pay these days, but close. If you do the math, it turns out to be the same cost per mile, but the trip was 15 minutes shorter and the engine ran smoother and stronger.

So, for those whose sole interest is cost savings, do the math the right way and figure the cost per mile, not the cost per gallon!
 

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I had an Audi that needed premium. Sure it was fun to drive, but with our Malibu Hybrid I don't miss that (here in WI) 20% premium......on premium......
Agreed. No reason to pay $0.50-0.75 more per gallon on premium in your Hybrid since premium isn't required or recommended. You get good performance without the premium penalty.
 

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I have a 2017 2.0 and use regular gas. I get 35 mpg. I don't know how any higher octane would get better.
I understand your position in regard to fuel economy, but there is more to the story besides MPG.

The engines that are smaller displacement, direct injected, and boosted, that are calibrated for higher output will benefit from the recommended premium fuel.

These engines in order to tolerate lower octane fuels will retard ignition timing and add fuel to keep temperatures and preignition at bay. There are circumstances where the electronics cannot compensate for the lower octane fuels, and there is potential for engine damaging preignition and excessive heat.

Operating engines calibrated for premium fuel in high ambient temperatures, at high speeds, and under high accessory loads or towing are especially vulnerable to potential damage by using a lower octane fuel.

The GM powertrain engineers recommend premium fuel in the 2.0 for a reason; I'm not one to take their recommendation lightly or test to see if there will be consequences.

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when the GF bought her 2.0 Turbo in 2013 it was not mentioned in her owner's manual, the window sticker or at the dealership (I asked when we were negotiating the price) about premium fuel being recommended...and my GM vehicles that recommended premium had a sticker on the fuel door, the window sticker as well as in the owner's manual...it was mentioned several times on this Forum that I should use premium in her Turbo and I resisted.

a short time later, I was shown that there was a newer version of her owner's manual where it was mentioned that premium fuel of 91 octane or above was recommended and I tried it...at first I didn't see any improvement either in performance or mileage (it is her car and I rarely drove it) and I thought those who pushed the premium fuel were wrong...

but not long after we started trying premium (93 octane near me) I saw her mileage jump from the steady 18 MPG (mostly city/short trip driving) to better than 21 and nearly 22 MPG...but the big change was performance as it seemed to me to be greatly improved...and performance is more than the "stoplight drag"...her car gets premium, always...and has always had synthetic oil but for the oil that came in the car when new...

I have read on this Forum of several issues people with the Malibu with 2.0 Turbo have had but hers has not experienced any of these issues...I'm glad I finally listened to several good and knowledgable members here opened my eyes to the need for premium when it really is recommended...YMMV and good luck with your choice

Bill
 

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Agreed. No reason to pay $0.50-0.75 more per gallon on premium in your Hybrid since premium isn't required or recommended. You get good performance without the premium penalty.
I understand the MH does not need premium. My thought is I am happy it doesn't, and I am equally happy to save the $500 per year (20,000 miles/20mpg*.5(Audi mpg)) premium premium.

My days of the need for speed are long gone and the MH performs just fine.
 

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I have a friend at the dealer that asked the mechanics. They said that mid-grade is fine so that's what I've been using in my 2017 2.0 Turbo. No problems at all. When I do get into it I've had nothing but fun.
 

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I have a friend at the dealer that asked the mechanics. They said that mid-grade is fine so that's what I've been using in my 2017 2.0 Turbo. No problems at all. When I do get into it I've had nothing but fun.
Have you ever run a few tanks of 93 to see if it seems smoother, more powerful, or gets better mileage overall? If not, why not consider it as a cheap test just to see? Like others have said, a fill-up of 10 gallons at "only" 30¢ a gallon more than mid-grade is only $3.00 a tank, and 3 tanks like that is still less than $10.

What's more, if you discover that it feels better or you can mathematically determine that it gets better mileage, you win. If not, what's $10 these days compared to a single trip to any service facility?
 

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When I first bought it I did use premium. When I found out that mid-grade would be OK I switched. I didn't notice a difference then but I suppose I could do the experiment again. I live in Atlanta now, I was in Texas then. Now I have a lot more seat time and may notice the difference more than I did before.
I'll try it on my next full tank.
 
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