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Hi I’m new here, I have a problem with my Chevy so when I’m in automatic it drives perfect great first car in my opinion then I realized I had a manual mode to it so I start to mess with it I was switching gears amazingly on manual mode till about 3 -5 weeks ago now when I got on to manual it gets stuck and it won’t shift gears but I can switch it back to auto and it runs perfect any one know how I can fix this ? Or what’s wrong here I really wanna fix it because this car has grow on me and I’d love to start drag racing it more maybe I need a new shifter?? Idk help guys I’m only 19 trying to get through life one bs step at a time lol
67904
 

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It has happened to me on my 2011, but it's intermittent. When it's really cold out (like today), it either fails to work or works only in (-). As the cabin warms up it'll return to working. Usually...
 

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Also, that button isn't for drag racing, the fastest acceleration is to put it in drive and floor it. Manual mode can be fun to play around with, and can be helpful in some situations, but it's terrible for performance.
 

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Also, that button isn't for drag racing, the fastest acceleration is to put it in drive and floor it. Manual mode can be fun to play around with, and can be helpful in some situations, but it's terrible for performance.
Mhmm idk when I use manual mode I can shoot up to the 7 on my rpm in first gear but on drive it’ll go maybe 5
 

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Mhmm idk when I use manual mode I can shoot up to the 7 on my rpm in first gear but on drive it’ll go maybe 5
Then when it's in D and your foot is in it and it shifts at 5000 RPM, that is when it's time to shift at that moment in that car. Running up to high RPMs doesn't necessarily make more power or get you down the road faster. Look at any power curve and the engine can/will turn faster even after it peaks. The time to shift is before that.

Yours appears to be the 2.4L 4-cylinder, which makes about 169 HP at its peak. The computer has tables that it uses to determine when to shift, and they're adjusted for the amount of throttle you're applying. The tables can be tuned using external software, but the biggest improvement you'll get is not so much performance; it's on-road manners revolving around cruise control and the general shifting strategy.

My 2011 with the 3.6L V6 used to "blort" when it got to 6800 RPM, which is the factory rev limiter setting. It would bounce off the limiter a few times before it shifted into 2nd gear and then it would never get to 6800 again before it shifted into the higher gears.

I had the limiter altered, eventually raising it to 7200, and after doing so, it ran all the way to where it couldn't spin anymore and shifted without the "blort" sound. Since then I've dropped it back down to 7000 and may even reduce it back to 6900 or 6800, but I'm undecided at this time.

Using M to shift means that you have to anticipate when you want to shift, then request the shift by pressing (+) and waiting what seems like an eternity before the BCM finishes all its calculations and passes the request on to the TCM. The transmission uses TM (torque management) to slightly reduce commanded throttle, gradually apply the friction material to shift into the next gear, and then reapply the commanded throttle. The TM ramp looks something like this \_ _ _/. The throttle reduction is \, the shift is _ _ _, and the reapplied power is /.

Mine has also had TM severely reduced to make the shifts quicker and snappier. When I'm applying ½ throttle or more, it'll shift from 1st to 2nd at about 42 MPH and chirp the tires on a hot day. When it's cold out, I can pretty much roast 'em when I want to.

To get the best performance (and I mean performance like you'd find on a drag strip), put it in D and hold your foot to the floor. If you can get to the 1/4-mile finish line faster in M, you'll be able to do that just once. It'll be a fluke and you won't be able to repeat it. I took mine to a drag strip on Test N Tune night, made 5 runs, and the best shifting was in D with my foot trying to dent the firewall, so to speak.
 

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Then when it's in D and your foot is in it and it shifts at 5000 RPM, that is when it's time to shift at that moment in that car. Running up to high RPMs doesn't necessarily make more power or get you down the road faster. Look at any power curve and the engine can/will turn faster even after it peaks. The time to shift is before that.

Yours appears to be the 2.4L 4-cylinder, which makes about 169 HP at its peak. The computer has tables that it uses to determine when to shift, and they're adjusted for the amount of throttle you're applying. The tables can be tuned using external software, but the biggest improvement you'll get is not so much performance; it's on-road manners revolving around cruise control and the general shifting strategy.

My 2011 with the 3.6L V6 used to "blort" when it got to 6800 RPM, which is the factory rev limiter setting. It would bounce off the limiter a few times before it shifted into 2nd gear and then it would never get to 6800 again before it shifted into the higher gears.

I had the limiter altered, eventually raising it to 7200, and after doing so, it ran all the way to where it couldn't spin anymore and shifted without the "blort" sound. Since then I've dropped it back down to 7000 and may even reduce it back to 6900 or 6800, but I'm undecided at this time.

Using M to shift means that you have to anticipate when you want to shift, then request the shift by pressing (+) and waiting what seems like an eternity before the BCM finishes all its calculations and passes the request on to the TCM. The transmission uses TM (torque management) to slightly reduce commanded throttle, gradually apply the friction material to shift into the next gear, and then reapply the commanded throttle. The TM ramp looks something like this \_ _ _/. The throttle reduction is \, the shift is _ _ _, and the reapplied power is /.

Mine has also had TM severely reduced to make the shifts quicker and snappier. When I'm applying ½ throttle or more, it'll shift from 1st to 2nd at about 42 MPH and chirp the tires on a hot day. When it's cold out, I can pretty much roast 'em when I want to.

To get the best performance (and I mean performance like you'd find on a drag strip), put it in D and hold your foot to the floor. If you can get to the 1/4-mile finish line faster in M, you'll be able to do that just once. It'll be a fluke and you won't be able to repeat it. I took mine to a drag strip on Test N Tune night, made 5 runs, and the best shifting was in D with my foot trying to dent the firewall, so to speak.
Well all I know is that when I’m on M I can beat more people in a race because my start is faster then once it hits 3rd or 4th it really takes off so idk then
 

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Mhmm idk when I use manual mode I can shoot up to the 7 on my rpm in first gear but on drive it’ll go maybe 5
I just looked at the factory 4-cylinder tune. Full throttle shifting in "drive" is set to 6500 rpm, and in manual mode you're probably banging against the fuel cutoff limiter at 6800 rpm.

Given that it's basically impossible to nail a good shift with the manual mode lag, you're not going faster in a race by shifting gears yourself, even if it might be more fun. Just put it in drive, plant your foot on the floor and go.

In order to fix the button, you probably need a new shifter knob, which is #24 in this diagram. It ranges from $38 to $55 before shipping costs depending on whether you get leather or not.

 

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I just looked at the factory 4-cylinder tune. Full throttle shifting in "drive" is set to 6500 rpm, and in manual mode you're probably banging against the fuel cutoff limiter at 6800 rpm.

Given that it's basically impossible to nail a good shift with the manual mode lag, you're not going faster in a race by shifting gears yourself, even if it might be more fun. Just put it in drive, plant your foot on the floor and go.

In order to fix the button, you probably need a new shifter knob, which is #24 in this diagram. It ranges from $38 to $55 before shipping costs depending on whether you get leather or not.

Okay bro thanks i appreciate the help 🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻
 
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