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I have a '16. The other day I got the battery save message and the car died. Wouldn't the constant start/stop/start/stop of the engine be a factor that I can yell at the dealership? Probably the worst idea ever in auto design.
 

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4 years on a car battery? Doesn't seem abnormal at all, especially if you have made the mods indicated by your previous posts. Replace the battery, carry on.

Auto Stop or stop/start systems being a bad idea is certainly possible and arguable but worst idea ever? I think you need to read up on auto history. Start with fuel tanks that are unshielded with loose fitting metallic fillers that explode on contact, E85 flex fuel cars that save a few cents a gallon at the pump in exchange for 20-40% lower fuel economy, or airbag inflators that explode ripping your face off instead of inflating an airbag.
 

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Today's batteries a junk. I replaced the battery in my '16 Equinox last fall and it doesn't have auto stop and it wasn't cooking in southern / western heat either.
 

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Why would you yell at the dealership for it? They weren't the ones who designed and built the cars, they only sell them. It'd be like yelling at Marathon because Marlboro decided to put a bit of asbestos in their cigarettes.

Depending on where you live, 4 years is not bad for a battery at all, especially depending on what one you get. I would usually get about 4 years out of an AC Delco battery myself. In fact I think I had a bum battery before I traded in my Malibu because it would be almost completely drained if I hadn't used the car in a day or two. The only reason I even replaced the battery was under suggestion because of the sulfur smell I would get under high acceleration. The previous battery was always fine so I think the Delco one was just a bad one. But 4 years, that's normal to me. If you have any sort of winters/summers like we have here in Michigan, that's a lot of strain on a battery. In fact you're putting more wear on your battery doing cold starts than when the engine is warmed up to operating temperature and the alternator is responsible for keeping the battery charged up.

Do I like the auto on/off feature? No, I think it's a bit of a waste, but I see where the idea is coming from. But campb292 is spot on about E85. My Impala with the 3.6 is an E85 flex fuel compliant engine but he also forgot to mention that besides the tradeoff of being cheaper but having worse fuel economy is that you need to change your engine oil more frequently, under the severe service condition rather than normal service condition so you're getting less fuel mileage for a few pennies saved and having to change your oil/filter more frequently as well as using the synthetic on top of that which is more expensive than just being able to use the regular conventional oil. Now that's a dumb trade off if you ask me!

As far as airbags go, lookup Davidsfarm on YouTube. His original channel has been terminated but people have been reuploading his videos. Check out where he put an airbag into a gas stove and detonated it. Now that's some scary stuff there.
 
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Today's batteries a junk.
I've given this a lot of thought back when the traditional flooded batteries kept dying in the 2.0T cars - those don't even have stop/start and were croaking at a year or two. If you search around the Google, failure in 3-5 years seems the norm now across all manufacturers. I've wondered if it is indeed new batteries are just junk. Lots of reasons to suggest that as the reality - collapse of North American battery production, cost cutting/greed, lack of component engineers etc. But I've also considered whether it is coincidence with the proliferation of demand on those batteries in cars. In the last 15 years typical demands have grown from an ECM, starting, and power windows to always on 7-10" infotainment screens, always on OnStar modules for remote connectivity, 4G wifi routers, dozens of modules/sensors for airbags and engine operation, proximity sensors, not to mention the wear from stop/start systems on top of that.

If the old standard was 5-7 years and new reality is 3-5, regardless of the cause (junk batteries vs more stress/demand), it seems 4 years is the time battery replacement should be considered as maintenance. I never had a problem with the battery in my 2016 but at 4 years I replaced it for a measly $165. No drama of having to be stranded first.
 
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If the old standard was 5-7 years and new reality is 3-5, regardless of the cause (junk batteries vs more stress/demand), it seems 4 years is the time battery replacement should be considered as maintenance.
Great way to look at it to be truthful! Our new cars are so computerized that there is a ton more load on the battery. Think about the high speed LAN connections and other things that are constantly being powered. Even my Impala knows as soon as I remote start it, what temperature it is outside and whether heat or A/C should be used. Let's face it, our cars do a lot more than just keeping the time and radio stations preset while sitting. Now our cars are almost like they're in standby mode, ready to go at a moment's notice. Almost nothing is mechanical on a car anymore that doesn't have a computer commanding it.

It's like gas mileage. You can get great mileage if you drive conservatively with as light of a load as possible. But start flooring it up a hill while hauling a 1,000lb trailer behind you. Your gas mileage will go down and consumption will go up simply because of the higher stress and demands placed on the vehicle.
 

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It has a lot to do with who makes a battery. Recycled lead, less lead internally, etc. . The OEM battery in my '11 Tahoe is a AGM and I replaced it 2 yrs ago. It was cranking just fine but at 7 yrs. I didn't want to get stuck away from home in sub zero conditions while snowmobiling. I went with a Odyssey battery for it's replacement. US made, not lead alloy but pure lead internally, double the life of others, there website details there construction. $50 bucks more but it's my choice now or Deka made batteries are all I'll use if not in a pinch if stuck. That AC battery from my Tahoe is on a BatterMinder Plus since coming out of the Tahoe and it jump started the dead Equinox just fine and did a weekend in my pop up without going dead last summer. There are only a few battery mfgrs. in the US and only 2 make a decent one. Research who makes what, you'll be surprised on what used to be good and now is junk.
 

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I had a red-top in my 2011 for more than 5 years when I replaced it with another last April - less than a year ago. The last couple of days it has struggled to start. Is there a best practice method for detecting a parasitic drain?
 

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the GFs A/C Delco in her 2013 2.0T lasted almost 6 years to the day she bought it new...I replaced hers with the top of the line Walmart Maxx Start made by Johnson Controls which always had a good reputation but they have been bought out...

batteries today lead a rough life...good luck with your choice

Bill
 

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It's the age of instant gratification. If Alexa can't answer it or a few thumb touch's don't work they get flustered. Problem solving skills are not taught very well. Decades of in home service experience here.
 

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My battery timeline so far:
Factory AcDelco Battery: 1/30/2016 - 12/12/18
Super Start Platinum H6 AGM: 12/12/2018 - 7/16/20
Super Start Platinum H6 AGM Warranty 7/16/20 - present

Also I've noticed that the voltage is low as 12.2V while driving during the day and sometimes at night. This started happening the start of COVID. The 2nd battery was reading these numbers before it died and the current 3rd battery is reading the same numbers atm. I know for a fact its rock solid at 13.5-13.8V beforehand. I had the 3rd battery tested at autozone and sure enough it was reading "low voltage" like the 2nd battery and the alternator failed the test. I got a quote today at the Chevy dealer and bringing it in this Wednesday 8/5/20. I'm out of warranty on almost everything so out of my own pocket it goes.
 

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If you can establish that it was bad on 12/12/18 and they failed to find and fix it, you might be able to get some consideration toward the repair. It can't hurt to ask.
 

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did your car start with an AGM battery???...I always thought the AGM was the best battery to get for all uses but I've read some things lately that point to alternators not charging AGM batteries when the original battery was a lead acid battery...sometimes over charging the AGM battery and the cause of some battery failures...

I've never had an issue with AGM batteries but have only had them as original equipment on 2 cars since 2001...when replaced I replaced the AGM with another AGM but other cars I've owned with lead acid batteries have been replaced with another lead acid battery...

I've not had early battery failures for any of my cars...

Bill
 

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My 2011 came stock with an SLA - sealed lead-acid - battery. After one was taken by a flood with only 44K, I bought a used one with 56K and only 3 months later it died. Not knowing what @SilverSport mentions above, I bought an AGM and it lived happily for just over 5 years, and this was after killing it dead enough to not start the car at least 3 times. I replaced it with another AGM and expect to get the same or better life from it since I'll be more careful about using it up.

One of the things I've learned is that AGM does not do as well with high temps like a flooded SLA battery does. But when it comes to providing more power for starting, AGM seems to be the winner.
 

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As for AGMs, the gen9 1.5T cars all come with a single AGM battery and auto stop. We see very few reports gen9 AGM battery failure - less than a half dozen forum reports over the last few years. What we do see is failure and other electrical issues on cars that have electrical mods such as taillight, headlight, or amp/speaker changes. The gen9 cars with auto stop just aren't always happy with electrical mods. When you check post history of those reporting premature or repeated AGM battery failure, you often find electrical mods.
 
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I got 7 years out of a Silver-Line/Mid-Grade Advance Auto battery recently! It was installed in my 2002 Impala, and this was an all-time record for me. Usually get 5+ years down here in the Carolinas. I usually either use a Wal-Mart Everstart battery or an Advance Auto battery ... whichever costs less. They all seem to perform about the same for me here. Maybe up North, in the colder climates, it would be different ??? I don't know ...

My luck could also have something to do with how my cars are driven: My 2002 Impala has been doing the daily work commuting the last 4 years, 200 miles per week (all highway), 4 days per week. My 2011 Nox gives the Impala a breather one day per week, handles errands on Sundays, and makes the 900-mile one-way jaunts back and forth to New England 3 or 4 times per year! So almost all highway driving for both cars. That might be the key, together with the warmer weather.
 

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Highway miles are almost always kinder on vehicles than city.

Heat kills batteries faster than cold, but cold is what puts a bigger strain on them when starting due to the reduced CCA available and the slightly stiffer engine that doesn't want to turn over so easily.
 

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Highway miles are almost always kinder on vehicles than city.

Heat kills batteries faster than cold, but cold is what puts a bigger strain on them when starting due to the reduced CCA available and the slightly stiffer engine that doesn't want to turn over so easily.
Then add the southwest summer heat and the extra heat from the 2.0L turbo next to the battery and you have a 2 year replacement cycle, AGM or flooded (good time to get the Walmart with the 3 yr replacement warranty).

GM's better design in the HHR (may be the only good design in that car) had the battery in the rear under the spare tire, which lasted over 8 years in the same southwest heat.

Hest kills the battery, and placing the battery next to a hot turbo is not the best design location.
 

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Should we wrap the battery shroud cover with gold reflective foil? Would that help a bit?
If the goal is normal battery life, undo mods - don't do more problematic mods.
 
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