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How often do you plan to change your oil?

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Currently using the OML as a guide and extending several thousand Km.
Using AMSOIL 5-30 XL and wix filter.
It's a known fact that filter quality(microns) makes a hudge difference. Considering changing once a year if oil analysis shows a clear slate
 

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Find out if the oil meets the dexos-1 standards or is equivalent. If it is it can be used without concern about warranty.

If you're unsure, go with full synthetic.

When OLM reaches 0% you can still go a while without any worry, according to GM.
That last part is not a good idea with the 3.6L V6. You saw the pictures of the stretched timing chains. #1 cause is going too far between oil changes.

I hope that PWeeZy42 has been checking his dipstick and keeping the oil topped off.
 

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I agree. I don't go past the OLM (I did only once while on a trip, though...), and I don't even get to 0% by the time I change it. I'd rather spend a little up front on more frequent oil changes than have it fail at a time that will have to be inconvenient, especially if Murphy's Law comes into play.

That's why I added the little bit on the end "according to GM", cause I don't endorse it myself.
 

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I usually go to about 5K. It might be lil less might be but rarely a lil more. Around that time the OLM reads 40-50%.

I new the owner/founder of Amsoil for a short period of time and he said then that even conventional oils were good for 5k under normal conditions and that Amsoil would be good for 7.5k or more. This was when Amsoil was just spreading its wings from 2cycle and into the automotive world.

Synthetics and newer tech has made the old 3/3000 a thing of the past but regular and timely oil/filter changes are still necessary, and running your oil to near the end of its life before changing it is still not a good idea. Maybe now the addage should be 6 months/5-6k miles which ever comes first.

And every engine is different these days, hence the changes to the OLM for the V6's and the issues long intervals will cause that Rodents is trying to show all of us.
 

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as someone who works in the automotive industry, one thing i have learned with the ecotec engines, when it comes to the filter. DONT USE A CHEAP ONE!!! there have been multiple times customers have came in and the paper filter was rock hard and literally deteriorating. ill be running synthetic in mine with a GM filter every 5k. I get free oil changes at the dealer for life of the car, but i dont trust those idiots working on my car.
 

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I just did mine today, just short of 6,000 miles and with 18% left on my oil life monitor. I only got mine changed now because I had free time today and might not get any for a while.

GM has almost 25 years of experience with oil life monitors and have become very good with the technology behind it. I'd have no problems relying on their data for telling me when to change my oil.
 

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I like the OLM and it‘s a useful tool, but I think it has some limitations. It has no way of knowing what quality or type of oil is in the engine, it has no clock to know the age of the oil and it does not know the condition of the engine and the resulting workload placed on the oil. For these reasons I would consider the OLM as only a rough estimate of oil change interval.

I would shorten the oil change interval in two cases. First, to get rid of the extra wear particles created as the engine of a new car breaks in. Secondly, if my car’s engine was old and tired I would change it more often as the oil is subjected to increased contamination as more combustion by-products are blown past the piston rings.

On the other hand, if the oil used has improved since the car was built [example: SAE class SM to SN] and the computer has not been updated, perhaps the oil change interval could be extended.

The problem with all this talk about engine oil is there are no comprehensive unbiased studies to guide us and everyone’s driving conditions vary greatly as do other factors that determine oil life.
 

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Actually I think it probably does know the workload placed on the oil seeing that it knows the temps and rpms placed on the engine. It seems the more we drive in the city the faster the OLM counts down.

Back when the car had about 4500 miles it was reading about 71% on the OLM and it had a lot of highway miles on it and that was during the Spring/Summer time.
We had the oil changed at 5845 miles and it is now at about 8245 miles so 2400 miles on the new oil and it is reading 61% on the OLM with mainly city driving and Fall/Winter time.

With the highway driving and warmer weather it was estimating about 15,500 miles before an oil change. Now it is estimating about 6,150 miles before an oil change with city driving and colder weather.
 

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I like the OLM and it‘s a useful tool, but I think it has some limitations. It has no way of knowing what quality or type of oil is in the engine, it has no clock to know the age of the oil and it does not know the condition of the engine and the resulting workload placed on the oil. For these reasons I would consider the OLM as only a rough estimate of oil change interval.

I would shorten the oil change interval in two cases. First, to get rid of the extra wear particles created as the engine of a new car breaks in. Secondly, if my car’s engine was old and tired I would change it more often as the oil is subjected to increased contamination as more combustion by-products are blown past the piston rings.

On the other hand, if the oil used has improved since the car was built [example: SAE class SM to SN] and the computer has not been updated, perhaps the oil change interval could be extended.

The problem with all this talk about engine oil is there are no comprehensive unbiased studies to guide us and everyone’s driving conditions vary greatly as do other factors that determine oil life.
You need to read up on how oil life monitors work because you're way off base with your assumptions.
 

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If anyone has any information, I'm here to learn.
Speaking of work load. I am not referring to the load on the engine [throttle positon etc.] but the increased load a worn engine places on the oil by allowing more gases to blow past the rings of a worn engine. This is hard on engine oil and I don't see any indicaton that the OLM accounts for this.
 

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If anyone has any information, I'm here to learn.
Speaking of work load. I am not referring to the load on th engine [throttle positon etc.] but the increased load a worn engine places on the oil by allowing more gases to blow past the rings of a worn engine. This is hard on engine oil and I don't see any indicaton that the OLM accounts for this.
You're talking as if the rings start going bad after the first oil change.
 

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From GM:

GM Oil Life Monitor System
Frequently Asked Questions

How does the system work?
The GM Oil Life Monitor System is not a mileage counter. It is actually a computer based software algorithm that determines when to change oil based on engine operating conditions. There is no actual oil condition sensor. Rather, the computer continuously monitors engine-operating conditions to determine when to change oil. Over the years, millions of test miles have been accumulated to calibrate the system for a variety of vehicles. The system was first introduced in 1988 and is now on more than 10 million GM vehicles.

How do I operate the system?
The GM Oil Life Monitor System is very easy to use. First, refer to the vehicle owner’s manual for a description of the specific ‘change oil’ message and the instructions for resetting the system. When the vehicle has been driven the appropriate miles, the ‘change oil’ message will be illuminated on the instrument panel or driver information center when the vehicle is first started. An oil change should be done within two fuel tank fill- ups from when the message was first displayed. Immediately after the oil has been changed, the system must be reset. After resetting, the ‘change oil’ display will no longer be displayed after engine start up.

I change my oil every 3000 miles, so of what use is this system?
You can continue to change your oil every 3000 miles if you so choose, but remember to reset the system after changing the oil or you will get a false “change oil” message. However the GM Oil Life Monitor System will allow you the ability to extend the mileage between changes without harming your engine. This will save you time and money as well as helping to protect the environment by minimizing the amount of used oil.

Do I have to use special oil?
The GM Oil Life Monitor System is calibrated for use with standard “Starburst” mineral- based automotive engine oil. Synthetic oils are not required except for the Corvette. Make sure to read the owner’s manual and select the viscosity and oil grade that is correct for your engine. Any oil selected for use should carry the ILSAC “Starburst”.

How many miles can I expect to go between oil changes when using this system?
The beauty of the GM Oil Life Monitor System is that it will automatically adjust the oil change interval based engine characteristics, driving habits and the climate in which the vehicle is operated. For instance, mild highway driving in a warm climate will maximize the interval between oil changes. Depending on the vehicle, this could be in excess of 7000 miles and as high as 12,000 miles. On the other hand, short trip driving in cold a climate may limit the oil change to 3000 miles or less. In general, most people that drive a combination of city and highway schedules find that the GM Oil Life Monitor System will indicate an oil change every 7500 to 8500 miles.

What happens if I change oil and forget to reset the system?
Since the GM Oil Life Monitor System does not actually sense oil condition, it is important that the engine computer knows when an oil change takes place. By enabling the reset (read owner’s manual for instructions), it lets the computer know an oil change has taken place. In the event that an oil change is done without resetting the system, the ‘change oil’ indicator will remain illuminated until the system is rest. The more miles that are driven without the system being reset, the more inaccurate the GM Oil Life Monitor System will be. If more than 500 miles have been driven after an oil change without resetting the GM Oil Life Monitor System, the oil change interval should be defaulted back to 3000 miles. After the oil has been changed and the system reset, normal use of the system can be resumed.

The oil change service station recommends that I change oil every 3000 miles. Why should I not believe them? The 3000 mile oil change is very conservative approach to maintaining your vehicle that dates back to 1968. Many advancements in engine and oil technology have been made since then. These advancements, in conjunction with using the GM Oil Life Monitor System, allow engine oil drain intervals to be increased without risking harm your the engine.

I change my own oil, should I reset the system myself?
You can reset per the vehicle owner's manual, or ask your selling dealer.

Will I damage the car if I don't get the oil changed soon after the light comes on?
As stated in the owner's manual, change oil as soon as possible. It is recommended that oil be changed within 600 miles of the change oil light / message.

Do I have to check my oil level now that my vehicle is equipped with the GM Oil Life Monitor System? Yes, the system does not sense oil level. As stated in the owner's manual, it is recommended that you check your oil every time you stop for gasoline.

Will I void my warranty if I don't go by the GM Oil Life Monitor System?
Complying with the owner's manual recommendations will maintain the warranty.

I had my oil changed recently and now my GM Oil Life Monitor System light came on. If the system was not reset (refer to owner's manual) at the time of oil change, the system can be reset as long as it's been less than 500 miles since the last oil change. If this mileage has been exceeded, change the oil at 3000 miles and reset system.

I prefer to have my oil changed still around 3,500 miles, what should I do?
It is ok to change oil prior to being notified by the vehicle. Be sure the system is reset even if the GM Oil Life Monitor System light has not illuminated.

My oil seems dirty, I have 6,000 miles and no light, do I have a problem?
Discoloration will take place under normal conditions depending on driving conditions. Refer to the Owner’s Manual for further information

Can any dealer other than my selling dealer perform Simplified Maintenance services? While we like to recommend the selling dealer, any GM Goodwrench dealership can perform the Maintenance I and Maintenance II service and reset the GM Oil Life System.

I use synthetic oil, should I expect to get more miles before the trigger point with GMOLS? The GM Oil Life System is calculated based on the factory fill requirement. While some benefits may exist, the oil drain interval is not extended due to the use of synthetic oil.

During Summer I drive my vehicle in a very hot climate, do I need to change oil more often? The beauty of the GM Oil Life System is that it calculates for severe climate use and determines the oil change interval just as it does for trailer towing as well as stop and go operation. There is no need to adjust the oil change based on climate, as well as vehicle use.

I continue to get 3,000 mile follow-up mailers from my dealer, what should I do?
Inform you servicing dealer that you prefer to go by the Maintenance I and Maintenance II driven by the GM Oil Life Monitor System so that they may adjust the way you receive follow-up mailings.

I have another GM vehicle a 2002 model with the GM Oil Life Monitor System, can I use the Simplified Maintenance Schedule with it also? While it is equipped with the GM Oil Life Monitor System, Maintenance I and Maintenance II was not yet introduced. The proper recommendation would always be to follow the owner’s manual.
 

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With my previous vehicle, I would change the oil every 3000-5000 miles but since I bought my Malibu new I decided that I would change the oil when the OLM said 25% which did not happen until I had 12,000 miles on it, all highway. This probably wasn't the best idea and I hope I don't regret it in the future. From now on I will most likely be changing the oil around every 5000-7500 miles.
 

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FWIW, (I have no interest in arguing with the crowd that wants to run 10K mile OCI's), since I'm a dealer tech in a GM dealership, I can tell you we do an enormous amount of engine work for seized rings, all of this has come about since the OLM system has been introduced. We've had them apart under 20K with seized rings. Especially the 2.4L and the 5.3L DOD motors in the trucks. The OLM system is nothing more than a calculation, period. A tech broadcast I watched years back, claimed you could run the OLM to 0%, reset it and run it to 80%, and then the oil was depleted. Okay, fine. Then why is it that we have recalls and bulletins being issued to reprogram the ECM in just about anything with a 2.4L, a 3.6L or a 5.3L engine in it? The OLM maximum mileage is being reduced when the ECM is reprogrammed. The 3.6L is being cut back to 5,000 miles and the 2.4 and 5.3 are cut back to, or around, 7,500 miles. GM isn't the only manufacturer with this issue.

Unless you put the mileage on very fast by doing almost all highway driving for long periods, I feel it's foolish to run past 5K if you want maximum life from your engine. If you swap it in every few years, go for it and it'll be the next guys problem. If you have oil consumption issues, you should reconsider your OCI once the engine is re-rung and cleaned up. Properly maintained engines do not normally use large quantities of oil. If you are adding oil between changes of more than a quart per change interval, there's a reason for it, more probable than not, it's sticking oil control rings.
 

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Good to see you back Rodents! I was hoping you weren't gone for good in jail or went over to the foreign car side or something ;)
 

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FWIW, (I have no interest in arguing with the crowd that wants to run 10K mile OCI's), since I'm a dealer tech in a GM dealership, I can tell you we do an enormous amount of engine work for seized rings, all of this has come about since the OLM system has been introduced. We've had them apart under 20K with seized rings. Especially the 2.4L and the 5.3L DOD motors in the trucks. The OLM system is nothing more than a calculation, period. A tech broadcast I watched years back, claimed you could run the OLM to 0%, reset it and run it to 80%, and then the oil was depleted. Okay, fine. Then why is it that we have recalls and bulletins being issued to reprogram the ECM in just about anything with a 2.4L, a 3.6L or a 5.3L engine in it? The OLM maximum mileage is being reduced when the ECM is reprogrammed. The 3.6L is being cut back to 5,000 miles and the 2.4 and 5.3 are cut back to, or around, 7,500 miles. GM isn't the only manufacturer with this issue.

Unless you put the mileage on very fast by doing almost all highway driving for long periods, I feel it's foolish to run past 5K if you want maximum life from your engine. If you swap it in every few years, go for it and it'll be the next guys problem. If you have oil consumption issues, you should reconsider your OCI once the engine is re-rung and cleaned up. Properly maintained engines do not normally use large quantities of oil. If you are adding oil between changes of more than a quart per change interval, there's a reason for it, more probable than not, it's sticking oil control rings.
Thats pretty interesting. I had a 3.5L Colorado before the Malibu and I would usually change my oil around 5000 miles. The oil was about as black as it could get yet the OLM never even went below 50%.
 

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Good to see you back Rodents! I was hoping you weren't gone for good in jail or went over to the foreign car side or something ;)
Jail, not on the horizon. The foreign car side is even less likely. Just very, very busy. I'll be around as much as time permits but not every day for quite some time. How's the gen 8 holding up?
 

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Thats pretty interesting. I had a 3.5L Colorado before the Malibu and I would usually change my oil around 5000 miles. The oil was about as black as it could get yet the OLM never even went below 50%.
The inline engines in the S/T truck line have been pretty good with the rings not getting stuck due to long OCI's. The valves leak a bit too much on some of them but it was a pretty good engine family. The tech across from me did a 3.6 in a Malibu for oil consumption. Pulled the cam covers off and it looked clean, the rings were hung up though. Just a bit too long on the oil changes. Just short of 100K on it. Maybe over time, technology will improve enough to make longer OCI's a reality, for the motors I mentioned though that's not presently the case.

I get to see what most of you don't. You can read the claims made by lots of people and you can read what I'm telling you I see in the service bay and draw your own conclusions. Either way, my job is secure.
 
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