Chevrolet Malibu Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2011 Malibu 2LT with a 2.4L Flexfuel engine. When I start the car, I get a ticking sound like a lifter noise. It last's just a short while, then goes away. Got me stumped?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
Does your car have Cali. emissions ? CA emissions cars have a air pump that runs on start up briefly. I'm not sure on your year car but my '09 had it. Pump is bolted to the front of the oil pan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
No, it doesn't. The noise almost sounds like hydraulic lifter noise. I had the cam positioning sensors replaced not too long ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I've been reading some of the other discussions on rattle and ticking on startup, and some talk about a timing chain tensioner or timing chain guide. I had a 88 Honda Accord that used to do the same thing on startup, now that I recall. They had a hydraulic tensioner that I replaced to fix the problem?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
Only way to verify guides aren't broken or worn is surgery. Got a lot of miles on it ? My '09 went 190k miles when I sold it, engine never apart. Synth oils only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
My 2011 has 71,000 on it. I talked to my service writer yesterday about my problem and he told me, if it's not a continuous rattlle, to monitor it. Worse case senerio is change the timing chain. About a grand the the repair. I'm thinking of maybe starting with the tensioner. As I said earlier, I had a Honda that rattled like that about the whole time I had the car. I suppose the tensioner is hydraulically activated. I burn E85 in my Flexfuel car, and he said if you do burn E85, you should change oil every 3,000 miles. He said the high alcohol content tends to leak down through the pistons into the crankcase. He said any car burning E85, he can tell by the smell of the oil in the crankcase. If the tensioner is hydraulic, the alcohol in the oil may have something to do with the function of the tensioner. I'm going to do an oil change at 3,000, and see if that affects the rattle. The E85 has a cleaning affect on the fuel system, but it also has a downside. When I don't use E85, I burn Shell, and sometimes mix 50-50.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
Looks like it's spring loaded. Procedure is below.
Timing Chain Tensioner Replacement

Special Tools


J 45027 Tensioner Tool

Removal Procedure

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection (LZ4, LY7, and LE5) (See: Starting and Charging\Battery\Battery Cable\Service and Repair)Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection (LAT) (See: Starting and Charging\Battery\Battery Cable\Service and Repair).
  2. Remove the camshaft cover. Refer to Camshaft Cover Replacement (See: Valve Cover\Service and Repair).



  1. Remove the timing chain tensioner.
  2. Remove the seal from the tensioner.
Installation Procedure




  1. Inspect the timing chain tensioner. If the timing chain tensioner, O-ring seal, or washer is damaged, replace the timing chain tensioner or O-ring seal as applicable.
  2. Measure the timing chain tensioner assembly from end to end. If the timing chain tensioner is to be replaced, a new tensioner should be supplied in the fully compressed non-active state. A tensioner in the compressed state will measure 72 mm (2.83 in) (a) from end to end. A tensioner in the active state will measure 85 mm (3.35 in) (a) from end to end.



  1. If the timing chain tensioner is not in the compressed state, perform the following steps:
  1. Remove the piston assembly from the body of the timing chain tensioner by pulling it out.
  2. Install the J 45027-2 (2) into a vise.
  3. Install the notch end of the piston assembly into the J 45027-2 (2).
  4. Using the J 45027-1 (1), turn the ratchet cylinder into the piston.



  1. Inspect the bore of the tensioner body for dirt, debris, and damage. If any damage appears, replace the tensioner. Clean dirt or debris out with a lint-free cloth.
  2. Install the compressed piston assembly back into the timing chain tensioner body until it stops at the bottom of the bore. Do not compress the piston assembly against the bottom of the bore. If the piston assembly is compressed against the bottom of the bore, it will activate the tensioner, which will then need to be reset again.
  3. At this point the tensioner should measure approximately 72 mm (2.83 in) (a) from end to end. If the tensioner does not read 72 mm (2.83 in) (a) from end to end, repeat steps 3-5.



  1. Inspect to ensure all dirt and debris is removed from the timing chain tensioner threaded hole in the cylinder head.
Caution: Refer to Fastener Caution (See: Service Precautions\Vehicle Damage Warnings\Fastener Caution).

Note: Ensure the timing chain tensioner seal is centered throughout the torque procedure to eliminate the possibility of an oil leak.

  1. Install the timing chain tensioner assembly. Tighten the timing chain tensioner to 75 Nm (55 lb ft) .
  2. The timing chain tensioner is released by compressing the tensioner 2 mm (0.079 in) which will release the locking mechanism in the ratchet. To release the timing chain tensioner, use a suitable tool with a rubber tip on the end. Feed the tool down through the cam drive chest to rest on the cam chain. Then give a sharp jolt diagonally downwards to release the tensioner.
  3. Install the camshaft cover. Refer to Camshaft Cover Replacement (See: Valve Cover\Service and Repair).
  4. Connect the negative battery cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection (LZ4, LY7, and LE5) (See: Starting and Charging\Battery\Battery Cable\Service and Repair)Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection (LAT) (See: Starting and Charging\Battery\Battery Cable\Service and Repair).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Wow! You are "Repairman" for sure. You certainly have some good material there. You must have access to the repair manuals? They told me at the Dealership it would be about $200 labor, then the cost of the part to put a new one in. If I was younger, I would probably attempt to do it myself, but now I have it done. Thanks for the descriptive drawings though, now I can see what the job entails. I looked on U-tube and saw one out of the car in a vise. I guess he was checking it. So, what I gather from your information, it is hydraulically operated? Hey, thanks a bunch Repairman54! I put it on the Forum so I would get some information, and now I've got it all. 😃
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
I have subscriptions for my fleet on Alldatadiy.com . Well worth the money and after the initial subscription only $35 for a 5 yr subscription for each vehicle. I don't tackle any repair without consulting it now, no hidden surprises Some of my 'scripts are still active as that car has moved on like my old '09 but my sister has a '12. .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
When I was younger and worked on my own cars. Things were much simpler then. I used to go to the library and consult with the repair books they had there. I think they were blue hardbound books, and they had them by year. I saved allot of money back then, and I enjoyed working on cars. Thanks again for your help Repairman!
 

·
Administrator
2011 Malibu LTZ 3.6L V6 Red Jewel Tintcoat
Joined
·
17,375 Posts
When I was young and worked on my own stuff, I went to the library and had to check out the books in the geology department to see if it was gonna hurt the rock before I carved a new part.

And no, my name isn't Fred or Barney! ;)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top