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Discussion Starter #1
I want to install the splash guards for my Bu by myself. I looked at the image on the GM parts house and the splash guards i have on my other cars. It seems like a simple jobs on the screws.
I just wonder if anybody have tried to that, and want to ask if you have remove your tires to install the guards. Thanks for any info.

Hoahai....Here's a forum link that should be some help.:cool: http://chevymalibuforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=652

The front flaps require a single screw into the metal of the wheel opening. Being in an area where the roads are covered with a salt/sand mixture for a large part of the winter season I didn't want to expose the metal by drilling a hole. I went to an autobody paint distributor and bought a seam sealer product that I used to glue the guard to the fender. The sealer is 3M's Heavy Drip-Check Sealer Part Number 051135 08531. I put it on the guard and used the other two screws to fasten the guard to the car and taped the upper end where the screw would have been to hold it in place until the sealer hardened. The sealer is paintable but there is only a little bit showing through the screw hole in the guard.

Bill
 

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Thanks for the pointer to the old thread and your advice. I think I will pass it. I did not expect to drill holes. I thought all the holes were already there and we just needed to screwed the guards in. It is harder than it looks.
 

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Thanks for the pointer to the old thread and your advice. I think I will pass it. I did not expect to drill holes. I thought all the holes were already there and we just needed to screwed the guards in. It is harder than it looks.
It isn't all that hard. There are a couple of other holes that have to be drilled but they are drilled in the plastic under the rocker. The sealer is a paste and it can be easily wiped on the guard. You put the guard on the car with the two screws at the bottom and then push the upper in place so the sealer attaches to the metal wheel well opening. Then you take a piece of painters tape and use it to hold the uppern end in place until the sealer drys. Installing the guards takes a few minutes and after a couple of hours the sealer is dry.

Bill
 

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The silicone itself will cause the hole to rust. A long time ago when RTV first came on the market I used to use a galvanized nail to stop up the dispenser when I was done using it. That nail would rust very badly where it made contact with the fresh silicone in the nozzle. I did some checking and found out that RTV has a chemical in it that causes rust.

Bill
 

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BillD64 is correct. I work on aircraft, and regular RTV is a corrosion NO-NO. There IS non-corrosive RTV's available though, we do use that type.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
BillD64 is correct. I work on aircraft, and regular RTV is a corrosion NO-NO. There IS non-corrosive RTV's available though, we do use that type.
How do you find the non-corrosive type at the auto parts store or home center? It might only be available as an industrial material as regular RTV was back in the 60s but I have never seen any mention on the product labels at auto parts or home center stores whether a specific product is corrosive or not.

Sort of answered my own question. Found this on the net:
DX Engineering Approved RTV Sealant
By Permatex

We have all used RTV to seal water out of things, right?

Have you ever sealed a piece of electronic gear with it -- then opened it some time later to find that it had still managed to become corroded inside?

Guess what? It's not the rain that corroded it - It's the RTV!

Normal RTV gives off acetic acid when it cures. That's the vinegar smell.
The acetic acid causes the corrosion.

DX Engineering has located a Neutral Cure RTV made right here in Ohio that is non-corrosive and is safe for sealing those baluns and other electronic gear that are going to be out in the weather.

Applies just like "normal" RTV, dries in one hour and cures in 24 hours at 70 degrees F.

And it doesn't smell like vinegar!
3.3 oz. Tube
Black


Available through the DX Engineering web site.


Bill
 
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