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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, I know tires loose pressure when it's cold out, but this is different. A few days ago it was 30 degrees or so out and I filled the front left (problem tire) to 32 psi. The front right (good tire) was at 28 psi. These both held their pressures fine for a few days, but this morning when it was around 0 degrees out, the front left was at 19 psi whereas the front right had only dropped to 26. I only mention the front right because it was my control. The tire shop took the problem tire in and put it in their tank but saw no bubbles. I took it in the basement and tried the soapy water trick for quite a while all over the tread, sidewalls, rim, valve stem, and valve core, but got no bubbles. The strangest part is that it only seems to leak when it's bitter cold out. This makes it difficult to have the shop trouble shoot. Anyone have any ideas at all? This is a new to me car so the dealer said they'd fix it for me, but it's one of those problems that nobody can figure out what exactly to fix.

It's been doing this on and off for the past 2 weeks. I've probably put 100 lbs of air in that tire. It always seems to hold air fine though when it's 30 or warmer out.
 

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well....I guess your basement is warmer than outside. Maybe do the leak test outside then?

And I am guessing there's no nails anywhere? I had a similar slow leak on then-my Accord, only it was not temperature dependent. Ended up being a nail.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I visually inspected every inch of the tire several times, of course I could have missed something, but it doesn't seem like a nail. I've had nails in tires before, and a tire shop has always been able to find nails by putting the tire in a tank. I'm just trying to think of a type of defect that would only show it's face in the cold.
 

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I dunno if that kind of analysis will really help. Say there's a nail in a tire, depending on how tight it's jammed into the tire the difference in temperature related contraction may or may not be important. Same probably goes for a defective valve stem.
Practically speaking, you would have to do your tests in the cold as well. And maybe the load matters too.

Or, can you maybe get the valve stem replaced and see if it still leaks? I am suggesting that because there's only so many fixable problems - valve stem or a nail (not in the sidewall). If you don't see a nail it leaves the valve stem. If that doesn't help you will probably need a new tire.

Any visible damage on the rim?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, perhaps my best bet is going to be to simply take it back to the tire shop and explain the latest. The problem is that if they can't see bubbles, they just throw ideas at it. Maybe I'll have them do the valve stems and reseat the tires all at once to see if it helps. It's going to warm up this weekend, so it might be difficult to tell for sure if it fixes it, but it probably can't hurt. Are the valve stems costly to replace with the sensors built into them?
 

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Yeah they're not too cheap. I paid about 40 or 50 canadain $ for each stem with a sensor. If you could get the stems separately it'd be better but you probably will not be able to, those are special stems.

Shouldn't you be able to get the stems replaced under warranty?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, the stems should be under warranty. It is also something that the ford dealer who sold it to me said they would fix (via the tire shop I've been taking it to). I guess I'll let the tire shop give it one more try, and once that's exhausted I'll take it to the chevy dealer and just let them deal with it.
 
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