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Discussion Starter #1
Did some searching but could not find a good post about it. Can you reset the TPMS system without having one of those triggering tools. Rotated the tires on my 2014 and would like to reset the positions so it reads correctly.

I know how to activate the learning sequence on the car through the DIC.....the screen says that learning is active and the horn beeps twice. Tried the ol' changing pressure in the tire trick but it doesn't do anything. Just reset the TPMS on a 2009 Silverado the other week using this method.

Searching has found numerous YouTube videos and posts stating you can do the tire pressure change trick on these newer cars. All sensors are functioning correctly, just not showing the correct tire position.
 

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If the Gen 8 is like Gen 9 then you need a tool, the tire pressure method doesn't work on the Gen 9's.

The tool isn't expensive, I bought a $20 one off Amazon and it works perfectly on my Gen 9 and even on my wife's 2010 Equinox that works with the deflation method too.
 

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GM vehicles from 2011 up need a trigger tool to reset the TPMS system. Prior models can be reset by changing air pressure or using a trigger tool.

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Didn't need them when I was younger. Wouldn't help me when the front sidewall blew out on my 2015 Bu' at night, but I have a real donut spare tire (thanks for nothing Chevy), tire-jack and X-wrench, as well as a 12-volt tire air pump and a flahlight. Could care less about tire pressure monitors. Chucking mine in the garbage as the tires are replaced. Sometimes simpler IS better and cheaper.
 

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2011 Malibu LTZ 3.6L V6 Red Jewel Tintcoat
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The only real benefit I've found from the TPMS was that it confirmed what I noticed as I walked to my car one day, that one of the tires appeared to be low. I had picked up a very small sliver of metal and it was leaking very slowly. No warning on the dash, but the pressure was about 6 pounds lower than the others as it weeped out its life blood overnight.

I've also found that the toothless wonder over where I bought my tires "keeps forgetting that these new cars have TPMS sensors that need to be reset." (His words, not mine. :eek:)

An owner still needs to pay attention rather than leaving it to technology to do for them what it just can't.
 

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I tend to appreciate having the TPMS on my vehicles. As long as the sensors have been initialized to the vehicle, it's not super critical that they be reset after changing wheel locations on your vehicle. They still will alert you that there is a tire with low pressure; you just won't know which one without checking them individually.

As to visually checking a tire for pressure; unless it is very low, you won't be able to tell just by looking if it is inflated to a safe pressure. The lower profile tires are extra hard to visually check.

I have a Silverado with 20's that are supposed to be inflated to 30 psi. A couple of the tires have slow leakage at the bead, and even though they appear to be inflated to the proper pressure, I've had the TPMS warning show that they were about 10 psi underinflated. Had I relied on just visually checking them I would have been driving on seriously underinflated tires.

I do regularly check my tires with a gauge: If I'm awake and dressed, I have a tire gauge in my pocket that I frequently use. The TPMS is just a redundant system to assure I don't inadvertently operate my vehicles on tires that are improperly inflated.

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Discussion Starter #7
I never drove a vehicle with TPMS up until a couple of years ago and obviously got by with it, but do think it is a nice feature. Keep in mind the main reason for these systems are for the people that have no clue they have low pressure in a tire and then go running down the freeway at 90 mph until the tire blows up and they wreck, then they sue the tire and vehicle manufacturers.

The TPMS did help me out awhile back and kept me from changing a flat on the side of the road....of course it was dark and raining at the time (isn't that the only time you get a flat?). I left my house and about 2 miles down the road the low pressure light came on. Since you get an actual number, versus just a low pressure warning, I could see it slowly dropping. Was able to quickly turn around and limp back to the house before the tire went completely flat. It's a lot nicer changing a tire in the garage with air tools then the side of a country road. The tire was completely flat by the time I got the car jacked up and starting pulling the lug nuts. Also as mentioned below it does alert you to low pressures before you can visually see them. Sure, I regularly checked the air pressure on my tires with a gauge prior to TPMS but not like I did it every time I got in the car.
 

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Last year my lady was going into work on the highway and cruising at 70 mph ish. The TPMS dinged and warned of the left rear tire losing some pressure. A few miles further it dinged again as her exit approached and she took the ramp at slower speed. She got off the highway and pulled into a hotel parking lot and found the tire was totally deflated within minutes. So for this situation it worked perfectly to alert her to the issue. Taking the exit ramp at usual speed could have lead to a crash.
 
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