Chevrolet Malibu Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently noticed a significant amount of water in the floor of my daughters car, a 2009 Chevy Malibu. When we pulled the carpet back there was several inches of water sloshing around. We pulled 3-4 gallons out with the shop-vac and the foam backing was still water logged. I checked the sunroof hose connection in the ceiling and it was dry and connected. I checked the often mentioned AC pipe, but it was dry around it and being winter in Oregon, the A/C was not in use so rain entry seemed a more likely culprit.

I have a thermal camera that attaches to your smart phone and decided to see if I could use it to trace the problem. I raised the sunroof a little and dumped hot water on the roof so it would fall into the sunroof channel and drain out the hose (as well as down the roof seam which has been mentioned to be a potential source of leaks). Sure enough, hot water could be seen to be coming in the cabin from the area of the A-pillar.

I removed the plastic pannel covering the A-pillar and realized the end of the hose was too short to reach the pipe that takes the water through the sidewall and outside of the vehicle. It was lined up but not connected so at least some of the water was coming inside the cabin. This is located just a couple inches below the top of the dash along the sidewall. You'll be able to see it through the windshield.


Hood Motor vehicle Automotive mirror Automotive design Vehicle
Bicycle Tire Bicycle tire Crankset Bicycle frame


Hood Automotive lighting Floor Material property Road surface


It only needs an inch or so to make it reach so I used the silicon tips from a couple metal straws. It worked perfectly.

Writing implement Office supplies Material property Cosmetics Magenta
Automotive tire Writing implement Finger Vehicle door Automotive exterior
Wood Automotive lighting Writing implement Rectangle Tints and shades



I decided to check the driver's side while I was at it and it had the same problem. An inch of water under the carpet and when I pulled A-pillar panel the drain hose was clearly disconnected, just hovering over the opening. I added the hose extender and inserted it back into its proper place. Needless problem solved!

Hand Automotive tire Hood Window Tire
Hand Azure Textile Sleeve Gesture


I'm hopefully done with new water seeping into the vehicle. It's astonishing that Chevy would make these so short. It might have barely reached when the hose was perfectly straight, but if it moves at all it's going to come loose either at the top or as in my case at the bottom. Now I have to pull the carpet and hang it inside somewhere until it dries so it doesn't mold and mildew. It's a lot of work and damage over an inch of hose. I'll never buy a Chevy product again.
 

·
Administrator
2011 Malibu LTZ 3.6L V6 Red Jewel Tintcoat
Joined
·
20,672 Posts
It's kind of you to share your journey with your daughter's car.

That final tag line, though, about not buying Chevy again. If the short hose is a sign of what you expect in the design of a car worth your money, you'll also want to stay away from Ford/Lincoln, Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep, Fiat (although that's a no-brainer), Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Subaru, Mazda, Volvo, Saab, Mercedes, BMW, VW/Porsche, Kia/Hyundai, and every other car that retails for under $750,ooo.

Or you can just learn to deal with the short-comings of whatever you buy, like the rest of us normal drivers do.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Malibu 1LT 1.5T/6-speed 6T40
Joined
·
4,230 Posts
I have seen this before but appreciated the write-up and pictures until I got to the end. It changed the whole intent from informative, useful fix to drawn out temper tantrum. A drain pipe shrunk or moved a bit over 13 years. If that sort of thing happening evokes that reaction you will soon be riding the bus. They all have parts that creak, move, break, warp, or bend over a dozen or more years of use.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tgburnett

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's kind of you to share your journey with your daughter's car.

That final tag line, though, about not buying Chevy again. If the short hose is a sign of what you expect in the design of a car worth your money, you'll also want to stay away from Ford/Lincoln, Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep, Fiat (although that's a no-brainer), Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Subaru, Mazda, Volvo, Saab, Mercedes, BMW, VW/Porsche, Kia/Hyundai, and every other car that retails for under $750,ooo.

Or you can just learn to deal with the short-comings of whatever you buy, like the rest of us normal drivers do.
This is just one of many design flaws that cause this model to fill with water and become a bathtub. Sunroof drainage, bad roof seal, water flow into heating system, A/C condensor hose. It took hours of perusing these forums to figure out which one I had. Never flooded my Dodge, Subaru, Mercedes, Honda, Nissan, or any other car I've had and here in Oregon, a water tight vehicle is a must.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have seen this before but appreciated the write-up and pictures until I got to the end. It changed the whole intent from informative, useful fix to drawn out temper tantrum. A drain pipe shrunk or moved a bit over 13 years. If that sort of thing happening evokes that reaction you will soon be riding the bus. They all have parts that creak, move, break, warp, or bend over a dozen or more years of use.
I'm seeing posts dating back over a decade with flooding problems related to this kind of design flaw including recalls so it is indeed a design flaw. I expect any vehicle I buy to at a minimum keep the weather out. I'm stuck with it now and I think this problem is fixed so I'm sharing my solution with others in the same situation that could have been avoided with a couple cents of extra hose.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Malibu 1LT 1.5T/6-speed 6T40
Joined
·
4,230 Posts
I'm seeing posts dating back over a decade with flooding problems related to this kind of design flaw including recalls so it is indeed a design flaw. I expect any vehicle I buy to at a minimum keep the weather out. I'm stuck with it now and I think this problem is fixed so I'm sharing my solution with others in the same situation that could have been avoided with a couple cents of extra hose.
I guess I am impressed you lived with this issue for 13 years. That many years with wet shoes from such a major design flaw must have been frustrating.

Good luck with your future purchases. Thread closed.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top