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What do you folks do with your used oil when you do your own oil changes?

What does "full" synthetic mean? There are three types of oil on the market, I believe. Regular, Synthetic Blend and Synthetic. So what does full synthetic mean?
 

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I know folks have mentioned not returning to dealer for the free oil changes. I'm one. When I bought the car (used), they said they changed the oil and filter and I would have one free O&F remaining. I had asked them what type of filters they use and was told an AC Delco... However, this is what they stuck on it, a Parts Master 67060. So much for the GM dealer keeping my car all GM... Hawk Chevrolet & Cadillac in Joliet, IL.

I use Mobil 1 5W20.
 

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I know folks have mentioned not returning to dealer for the free oil changes. I'm one. When I bought the car (used), they said they changed the oil and filter and I would have one free O&F remaining. I had asked them what type of filters they use and was told an AC Delco... However, this is what they stuck on it, a Parts Master 67060. So much for the GM dealer keeping my car all GM... Hawk Chevrolet & Cadillac in Joliet, IL.

I use Mobil 1 5W20.
Wow, what a picture...I think you should write a review on them and see if it gets posted...lol. :wink:

https://www.facebook.com/Hawk.Chevrolet/app/490444277731700/
 

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Amsoil: the best

I have a 93 Eagle Talon N/A that is used on the track. It has 232,000 miles and uses very little oil, but it does leak some around the crank shaft seal. It gets about 25 mpg with hard driving and I go a year between oil/oil filter changes using 0W30. I've had this car for 6 years and started it off with Amsoil. I also use their manual transaxle fluid.

As soon as the free oil changes are done, I will switch over to Amsoil 0W20 and synthetic auto trans fluid.


From the AmsOil website:
AMSOIL, the leader in automotive synthetic lubrication, produced the world’s first API-qualified synthetic motor oil in 1972. Trust the extensive experience of AMSOIL, the First in Synthetics®, to do the best job protecting your engine.

Protects Your Engine
AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil provides outstanding anti-wear protection. It develops a strong fluid film that keeps metal surfaces separated while its robust anti-wear additives further reduce wear in metal-to-metal contact regions for maximum engine life. In the industry-standard Sequence IIIG Engine Test, AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil delivered 75 percent more engine protection against horsepower loss and wear than required by a leading industry standard.** For details, see the Double-Length Sequence IIIG Engine Test Technical Study (G3320).

Maximizes Fuel Economy
Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil is designed to maximize energy efficiency for optimum fuel economy. Unlike conventional oils, its uniform molecular structure helps it flow more freely and reduce friction between metal surfaces. Anti-friction additives are included to further improve energy efficiency.

Extends Drain Intervals
AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil can extend drain intervals far beyond those recommended for conventional oils. Its unique synthetic formulation and long-drain additive system are inherently stable to resist oxidation and neutralize acids over longer periods. Signature Series is designed to deliver outstanding engine protection, cleanliness and performance over extended drain intervals. It reduces vehicle maintenance and waste oil.

Keeps Pistons Clean
Excess piston deposits can lead to pre-ignition and engine knocking, which results in lost power, reduced fuel economy and, in severe cases, engine damage. Signature Series’ premium additives and naturally high resistance to extreme heat help keep pistons clean for maximum engine performance. Signature Series prevents piston deposits 93 percent better than required to meet the latest API standard.**

Sequence IIIG

Excels in Extreme Temperatures
Signature Series resists thermal (heat) breakdown better than conventional and synthetic motor oils. It is heavily fortified with detergent and dispersant additives to help prevent sludge deposits and keep engines clean. Unlike conventional oils, Signature Series contains no wax, staying fluid in sub-zero temperatures for easier starting, improved oil flow and reduced wear.

Reduces Oil Consumption and Emissions
Volatility (burn-off) occurs when oil gets hot, causing high oil consumption and emissions. Signature Series resists volatility better than other oils, helping reduce oil consumption and emissions.

APPLICATIONS
AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil is excellent for use in all types of gasoline-fueled passenger cars and light trucks. It is recommended for all domestic and foreign vehicles requiring any of the following performance specifications:

0W-20 (ASM): API SN (Resource Conserving), SM…; ILSAC GF-5, GF-4…; ACEA A1/B1; GM dexos1™ (supersedes 6094M) Fortified with detergents that exceed dexos1 sulfated ash specifications; Chrysler MS-6395; Ford WSS-M2C947-A

*All trademarked names and images are the property of their respective owners and may be registered marks in some countries. No affiliation or endorsement claim, express or implied, is made by their use. All products advertised here are AMSOIL-engineered for use in the applications shown.

COMPATIBILITY
AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil is compatible with other conventional and synthetic motor oils. Mixing AMSOIL motor oils with other oils, however, will shorten the oil’s life expectancy and reduce its performance benefits. AMSOIL does not support extended drain intervals where oils have been mixed.

Aftermarket oil additives are not recommended for use with AMSOIL synthetic motor oils.

SERVICE LIFE

Normal Service – Up to 25,000 miles, 700 hours of operation or one year, whichever comes first, in personal vehicles not operating under Severe Service.
Severe Service – Up to 15,000 miles, 700 hours of operation or one year, whichever comes first.
Severe Service: Primarily short trips (less than 10 miles [16 km]); turbo/supercharged engines; commercial or fleet vehicles; excessive idling; first-time use of AMSOIL motor oil in a vehicle with more than 100,000 miles; frequent towing, hauling, plowing or driving in dusty conditions.

Modified engines (non-stock) and those using E85 fuel are excluded from extended drain recommendations.
Change at the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended drain interval outside U.S. and Canada.
AMSOIL Ea® Full-Flow Oil Filters are designed for extended change intervals. With other brands, do not exceed six months or 10,000 miles unless longer intervals are recommended by the vehicle manufacturer.
Check oil regularly to maintain proper fill levels.
AMSOIL Ea® Full-Flow Oil Filters are designed for extended change intervals. They stop smaller particles, flow more oil and last longer than regular filters. For best performance, use AMSOIL Ea Full-Flow Oil Filters.

AMSOIL PRODUCT WARRANTY
AMSOIL products are backed by a Limited Liability Warranty. For complete information visit AMSOIL Limited Warranty - Lubricants.
 

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Full synthetic (napa or valvoline, whoever has a sale/rebate) 5W-30 with Baldwin filter at 4000-6000 mile intervals. Baldwin Filters are popular among large semi trucks and they drive way more miles than anyone. Wix would be another good filter brand. What I understand from bobistheoilguy forums for the ecotec 2.5 is that 0w20/5w20 is better for gas mileage and 5w30 is better for engine protection. Don't forget to change the air filter on a regular basis as well as that is the first defense against keeping your oil clean. I also never run anything less than full synthetic even in my lawn mowers.
 

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What ever my dealer puts in it for $39.95 which also includes the tire rotation which I can not do myself. I have done all my old changes on all my bikes and cars until now.. I have a 5 year bumper to bumper warranty. They charge $7 more to do the oil change than what I could do it myself and like I said that doesn't include the tire rotation.. then if I ever do have a warranty issue related to internals of a engine, I don't have to go looking of receipts and hope everything falls in order .. I fully believe in doing your own ...but for this price I would be silly not to use them... don't have to also worry about disposal either.
 

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FYI - Menards has all Quaker State Dexos full synthetic oil on sale for $2.99 a quart after menards rebate. A few weeks ago they had Valvoline full synthetic on sale for $2.99. Napa had their Napa Full Synthetic oil on sale for $2.99 a quart a few months ago. This is not the first time I have seen these sales. Napa has been having this 2.99 sale off and on for years. With the deals out there, depending on your oil filter, you are looking at $20 to $25 oil and filter changes with full synthetic. Quaker State also has an additional $7 one time rebate if you buy 5 quarts so then you are looking at a full synthetic oil and filter change under $20.
 

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I go with whatever is the cheapest Dexos approved 0w20 full synthetic. For filters I go with whatever reputable brand is on sale at rockauto, usually order 5 at a time. I change the oil every 5k or 6 months, I started with 5w20 oil, then switched to 0w20, I think the car likes the 0w20 better.
 

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Would recommend Mobil 1 5W 30 or similar in a Valvoline or Castrol with a slant to a full synthetic. I'd stay away from Quaker State. Their products will NEVER go in my Malibu :)
 

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2011 Malibu LTZ 3.6L V6 Red Jewel Tintcoat
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Not sure if they've shaken the reputation, but when they were made exclusively from "Pennsylvania Crude Oil", it contained so much paraffin that the vaporized goo would collect on the underside of the oil cap and in other places inside the engine.
 

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"Pennsylvania Crude" was just a marketing gimmick by Quaker State. Crude oil is an alphabet soup of materials that are separated and upgraded at the refinery. Crude oil goes into the refining process. Picture a tall distillation column, say 200 ft. high. "Light ends" (propane, butane, natural gasoline) come off the column near the top, "Middles" come off, you guessed it, near the middle of the column and include No. 2 diesel and the paraffins (saturated hydrocarbons aka n-alkanes) that are the base stocks for motor oils. "Bottoms" off the column include parafin wax, heavy fuel oils (No.4 and No. 6) and the dregs - asphaltics. So.......you can take any crude oil from anywhere in the world and run it through a refinery and get all these products. Some minor tweaking may be needed based on how sour (hydrogen sulfide & sulfur conent) the crude is, but my point is that paraffinic base motor oil stocks are the same no matter where the crude oil came from. So to knock "Pennsylvania Crude" as inferior or too high in paraffins is misinformed. Paraffinic base motor oil sticks are superior to those from napthenic stocks.

That "coffee with cream" colored material that collects on the underside of the oil filler cap has nothing to do with where the crude oil came out of the ground. It is an oil-water emulsion that results from water vapor condensation.

So going further, it is the additive package that makes or breaks a motor oil these days. Quaker State may not have the best additive package, but it meets the latest API Standard.
 

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"Pennsylvania Crude" was just a marketing gimmick by Quaker State. Crude oil is an alphabet soup of materials that are separated and upgraded at the refinery. Crude oil goes into the refining process. Picture a tall distillation column, say 200 ft. high. "Light ends" (propane, butane, natural gasoline) come off the column near the top, "Middles" come off, you guessed it, near the middle of the column and include No. 2 diesel and the paraffins (saturated hydrocarbons aka n-alkanes) that are the base stocks for motor oils. "Bottoms" off the column include parafin wax, heavy fuel oils (No.4 and No. 6) and the dregs - asphaltics. So.......you can take any crude oil from anywhere in the world and run it through a refinery and get all these products. Some minor tweaking may be needed based on how sour (hydrogen sulfide & sulfur conent) the crude is, but my point is that paraffinic base motor oil stocks are the same no matter where the crude oil came from. So to knock "Pennsylvania Crude" as inferior or too high in paraffins is misinformed. Paraffinic base motor oil sticks are superior to those from napthenic stocks.

That "coffee with cream" colored material that collects on the underside of the oil filler cap has nothing to do with where the crude oil came out of the ground. It is an oil-water emulsion that results from water vapor condensation.

So going further, it is the additive package that makes or breaks a motor oil these days. Quaker State may not have the best additive package, but it meets the latest API Standard.
I really appreciate it when someone knowledgeable comes along and spells it out in such an easy-to-understand manner. Thank you!

So the bad rap that PA crudes got was just that - a bad rap. I'll definitely consider this info when sharing my opinion in the future.
 

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I've been using Amsoil in my motorcycle and cars for over 20 years. Recently I'm starting to reevaluate my loyalty to Amsoil based on the money you spend for it and the results I have recently received.

I have a 2011 Victory Vision motorcycle Amsoil has been in the engine since 500 miles that's when the brake and oil needs replaced the engine currently has 25,000 miles on it and needs a complete rebuild. This Freedom 106 engine is not known to have problems. Problems I started to develop was low compression. Upon inspection has been discovered the roller cams headwear where the bearing would be the cam carrier shows excessive wear and the cylinder walls shown stuffing

Two separate engine builders have looked at the engine. Interestingly their first question has been what oil have you been using?! When I told them Amsoil they seemed shocked and puzzled. There is no mechanical failure as in broken parts or pieces of metal found but yet there where exists.. in no way am I blaming Amsoil for causing the problem. But at the same time I think I had a false sense of imaginary reality that using such a loyal make sure engine Bulletproof. We hear and see all the advertisements of how you get a dramatic reduction in wear etc. But now I'm starting to realize that's in a controlled environment..

My oil change interval for the motorcycles every 5000 miles I never even went more than 3500 miles before I would change it just because I didn't mind doing so.. I guess my point is I've spent a premium penny on this oil only to have that rebuild my engine either way. Like I said I'm not blaming Amsoil but Amsoil most definitely didn't prevent anything.. I may still use it I don't know..
 

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I was chuckling a little when I read your comments. I've had my smartphone make some interesting word choices when using the speech-to-text feature.

If AmsOil didn't cause the issue then it's not impossible that it reduced the severity. Had you used a synthetic blend or conventional oil, the issues you discovered may have appeared much sooner or been worse. That's a 2-sided coin, though. Had it failed earlier it might have been covered under a warranty. But it also might not, and it might have been so severe that it may have taken more than just a few parts.

So, continuing to use AmsOil or moving to another brand is your choice, but I don't see where making that decision can be predicated on the failure, especially considering your own comments about the cause.

Let us know when the bike is back on the road. Just might have to meet halfway between here and there and get some pictures.
 

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I've been using the 15k mile Amsoil 5W-30 in my 2012 Malibu (good for 15k miles or 6mos with the use of their filter, which I believe is a WIX premium synthetic filter), with the preferred customer thing I have with my dealer where I get the oil at cost ($20 a year), it ends up being about the same cost as Mobil 1 synthetic and I am going 2x the mileage (with the Mobil 1 I was going 4k with the Amsoil I am going 8k.) I have just reached the 4k mi mark and upon checking the oil, I can say it is much cleaner than the Mobil was at 4k, and it has not lost any oil. I am only on the Amsoil bandwagon after the dealer told me about a diesel service truck they have (they are a repair place) that didn't see a lot of miles, but it saw a lot of idling time. They didn't want to change the oil all of the time because of how much it took, and how expensive the filters were. So they used the oil good for 25k miles or 1 year, and had it tested each year. They kept having it tested and it kept coming back good. Until finally on the 7th year they had tested it, Amsoil said that it would need changed within the next year. So they would've had the possibility of going 8 years on this diesel oil change. Now I know our cars are not like a big diesel truck, nor am I planning on going 8 years without changing my oil. But them being able to do so made me jump on the Amsoil bandwagon. Anybody else have thoughts on Amsoil?
Regarding your question about experiences with AMSOIL, here's one. I had a 98 Aurora. One summer (2004, >100k miles), sitting in dead still traffic on the DC beltway with temps in the upper 90's, my oil pressure warning kept dinging at me every few minutes, until I finally could drive a bit to get the pressure up. The Aurora gave you a pressure measurement in PSI. I brought it to my service guy, and he said the heat thinning out the oil, combined with possibly some engine wear were not allowing the system to maintain oil pressure. I had already surmised that, since I had a full oil pan. He suggested 5W-40 synthetic and I told him I tried 5W-40 but it didn't help. Honestly, I forget whether I had tried synthetic or not, but I either mentioned Mobil 1, or I told him I tried Mobil 1, and he said, "No - "use AMSOIL. We don't carry it, but I think you can get it at... (wherever he said)." His point was that AMSOIL was especially good at not breaking down and maintained viscosity at higher temps. It worked all summer. From then on, that's all we've been using. I used it in a 2005 Buick Rainier from the first oil change, and then 11-1/2 years until we traded it in, and it was solid the whole time. Admittedly, never looked inside the Buick V8, but never had any issues, either.
 
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